Just How Bad Are Your Favorite Drinks? | Snohomish Dentist

When choosing what to drink, do you often opt for the sugary variety? Chances are the answer is yes. After all, that’s why they are made – to entice you to choose it. Unfortunately, even fruit juices are bringing extra sugar to your mouth, and that sugar is getting ahold of your smile and causing cavities. The best option for hydration is always going to be water, but just how bad are those drinks for your teeth?

Fruit juice. It is important to have lots of fruit and vegetables in our diets because of their vital nutrients. The problem is, juices made of citrus fruits like orange, lemon and grapefruit are very acidic and this acid has been proven to wear down your tooth enamel. A wise rule of thumb is to limit these juices to once or twice a day to get your vitamin C boosts. If you have a straw handy, even better.

Sports drinks. Sports drinks and energy drinks have made a drastic impact on our lives for a couple of reasons. They help to hydrate your body quickly after a hard workout and gives us an energy boost when we need it most. New York University College of Dentistry conducted a study that shows sports drinks contain high levels of acids that may be linked to a condition called erosive tooth wear.

Soda. I think we all know that soda is bad for us, yet we still decide to drink copious amounts of it. According to the American Dental Association, Americans drink more than 53 gallons of soft drinks per person per year. This can lead to dental erosion caused by the carbonic, citric and phosphoric acids.

If you would like more information about the affects of drinks on your teeth, call Dr. Haines in Snohomish, WA at 360-568-8577 or visit www.tedhainesdds.com.

Dr. Haines proudly serves Snohomish, Monroe, Lake Stevens, Everett, Mill Creek, Woodinville, and surrounding areas.

How Stress Can Affect Your Smile | Snohomish Dentist

Stress is a feeling few can say they’ve never felt. As life progresses on, it seems we add more stressors into our life. The unfortunate thing is, it is very difficult to overcome the sense of dread that comes with stress, and if left untreated, can lead to further health issues. But did you know that too much stress can also be affecting your mouth, teeth, gums as well?

Mouth sores. While we aren’t sure of the causes of canker sores, many experts have attributed them to a weakened immune system, bacteria, or viruses. The good thing is, they aren’t contagious. Cold sores or fever blisters, on the other hand, are caused by the herpes simplex virus and are contagious. Times of emotional stress can trigger an outbreak, but they also can happen with a fever, sunburn, or a skin abrasion. Treatment for both is available, including over-the-counter remedies and prescription antiviral drugs.

Teeth grinding. Beyond the typical headaches, one of the natural outcomes of stress is clenching and/or grinding of your teeth. While it can happen at any time of the day, it typically happens at night, so many don’t even know it’s happening. If left untreated, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder can occur by grinding your teeth, so a night guard may be recommended.

Gum disease. Stress can cause an increase in dental plaque, even when the high stress levels are short-term. Long-term stress can boost your risk of bleeding gums, or gingivitis, which can progress to serious gum disease. It is important that you keep up your daily dental routines in order to offset these symptoms from progressing.

If you would like more information about the affects of stress on your smile, call Dr. Haines in Snohomish, WA at 360-568-8577 or visit www.tedhainesdds.com.

Dr. Haines proudly serves Snohomish, Monroe, Lake Stevens, Everett, Mill Creek, Woodinville, and surrounding areas.